Forum
Register  |   |   |  Calendar  |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 4      1   2   3   4   Next
msusong

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 122
Reply with quote  #1 

“You will find that taking the first step is very often the hardest part of the journey.”


Share your biggest "a-ha moment" from the book. What do you plan to do differently in the upcoming school year? 

*BONUS (and this may be related to your "a-ha moment"): what's your favorite quote from Part III?

“Kill the inner critic who blocks your creative flow.” 


__________________
Maggie Susong
ATPE Member Engagement Coordinator
Kmills2

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #2 
My "take away" from this book is the reminder that I teach goals set out by our state, not a particular program.  I have been feeling pressure from above to "teach" our program as written.  They would like to standardize our program across campuses by having a one size fits all program presentation.  Our program guides are very good, but they do not account for the background and experiences my particular group of students have had or not had.  They do not always present information in a way that connects to my particular group.  It is OK, even great, that I deviate from the scripted presentation to better accommodate my group's individual characteristics and interests.

Bonus - favorite quote p. 171 -"Let's just be sure that the "definite purpose" of collaboration is improving education, not simply standardizing it."
Finister

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #3 
I think my biggest "a-ha" moment was just realizing that although I'm not doing it like many of my colleagues, I'm still doing it right. I like that Dave Burgess encourages each teacher to be the best version of themselves that they can be, rather than trying to fit into someone else's mold. I will definitely be incorporating the Mission Impossible hook into some sort of inferencing lesson disguised as an escape room. Too fun!

My favorite quote has to be the Mark Twain quote: "Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great." I like it for two reasons: first, it reminds me not to listen to the nay-sayers and Debbie-downers in the building. Haters are going to hate. Second, it reminds me that it is my obligation not only to be great, but to show my students that they can be great! I am setting a personal goal to find at least one great thing about every student within the first two weeks of school that I can point to and help them build on.
sroling

Registered:
Posts: 48
Reply with quote  #4 
I've been a major believer in the fact that students with disabilities can do and should be in the general education setting. for me, Teach Like a Pirate is that blessing which I sincerely hope will be read and re-read by all teachers.  My school district has been a big proponent of strategies.  Over the years I have become acquainted with nearly all of the strategies in this book.  Teach like a Pirate confirmed what I personally have found to be true and put it in simple understandable language for all teachers. 

For me, the new information was how to work music into curriculum.  As a retired public educator now working with youth and adults with disabilities in the horse world, I have the opportunity each week to help parents help their children and help parents communicate better with teachers so that teachers can help all of the children whose lives they touch each day.  Mission Impossible is what I do all of the time when I teach riding.


__________________
Sanna Roling
tugglets

Registered:
Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #5 
Biggest a-ha moment from the book:  My two favorite educational quotations come from Teddy Roosevelt and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and he used different quotes from the same two historical figures.

What I am going to do differently next year:  My students do role plays.  They are going to do more based on the historical readings in the text.  We are also going to start earlier with the educational art work so that I can decorate the room earlier.  I am going to try and add more educational artwork besides posters of influential people, states, and cities.

My favorite quotation:  "Playing cautiously is a recipe for failure."  



__________________
Teresa Tuggle
jgwilroy

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #6 
My biggest a-ha moment was realizing that I need to incorporate more hooks to help the students become more engaged. This is my goal for the next school year.

Favorite quote: "Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make your feel that you, too, can become great." Mark Twain.
JTodd75

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #7 
I think my biggest "ah-ha" moment arrived with an earlier question. I do some pretty out there activities because what I teach (music) is so abstract I have to make sound conscious to students with lots of different styles of learning. I had thought about putting together a presentation on of my crazy ideas but didn't and now the deadline is passed however after reading this I've decided to develop the idea and come up with some other activities that would make a lot of administrators wonder "what does this have to do with music" and submit it for next year!

Another moment at the end of the book is when he stated that he still doesn't get 100% engagement. Thank you!

__________________
Jenny Todd
msusong

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 122
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTodd75


Another moment at the end of the book is when he stated that he still doesn't get 100% engagement. Thank you!


YES! Love how realistic he is about trying new things. Thanks for sharing!

__________________
Maggie Susong
ATPE Member Engagement Coordinator
dawskd

Registered:
Posts: 34
Reply with quote  #9 
I first read this book about two years ago.  My copy is highlighted with notes in the margins.  My "A-Ha" moment happened then. I love my team, but there are a lot of "non-pirates" on my team.  I often held back because I let their negativity slow me down.

I have found a new team.  I have always loved technology integration. My technology director has always been extremely supportive of my crazy tech ideas in the classroom. I decided last year that I needed to explore that full time.  Throughout this last school year, along with amazing support from my technology director, I acquired a full-time Digital Coach position in my school district. This was not a position when I began my journey, but it was something that was needed.  My new position became official in May.  My new team is AMAZING!! I now work on all 3 campuses in my school district with people who are seeking help with technology integration.  I LOVE IT!!  I have found my team of Pirates (they are spread all over the school district.)

"Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great."  -Mark Twain
cat_holladay16

Registered:
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #10 
My biggest "ah-ha" was that even the most "difficult" child can be hooked into a lesson, it just takes time and effort on the teacher's part. I see a lot of students who become behavior problems as soon as they figure out that a particular teacher is just going through the motions each day. It seems like a no-brainer that being passionate and enthusiastic would create engaged learners, but I realize for some teachers the fear of failure or criticism is most likely what is holding them back. 

For next year, I hope to draft a band of pirates at my school that are willing to try out some of the hooks that are suggested in Part II. After a short introductory PD on the ideals behind Teach Like a Pirate, I would offer monthly suggestions on different hooks that could be used and highlight those teachers who attempt them in their classrooms.

My favorite quote from Part III: The world is filled with examples of people who never achieved what they wanted because they over-estimated the difficulty of it and never even bothered to try.

__________________
Cathy Holladay
Newt82

Registered:
Posts: 63
Reply with quote  #11 

My “a-ha moment” from the book is the reminder it’s okay to step outside of the box. My first long term job I did not have any technology in the room (I had what I fondly call the lemon room). I did have a computer, but my smart board and projector never worked right. Since I didn’t have proper access I had to get real creative in my lessons. Interestingly several of the teachers asked about some of my lessons, wanting to try them out in their room.

I love collecting quotes! My favorite quote from part three is, “All art is a series of recoveries from the first line. The hardest thing to do is put down the first line. But you must!” Nathan Olivera p.153 

ritawilcox

Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #12 
My greatest "ah-ha" moment came early in the book, when the author describes his rapport-building exercises the first few days of school.  He creates some "off the wall" experiences to grab the students' attention, such as turning the lights out to fly around the room making jet motor noises.  Few teachers would be comfortable with showing off this very playful side of their nature, especially during the first days of school.  He seems to be encouraging the "cut-ups" in the classroom.  At first I would be afraid of losing control of the classroom, if silliness is encouraged on the first days of school.  Thinking it through, though, I believe he is on to something. If your classroom is enjoyable and exciting, your students will love coming to your class.  If too much disruption occurs, you can always take it down a notch.  I can't wait to try this!

This ties into my favorite quote from Part III:  "do you want to be safe and good, or do you want to take a chance and be great?" by Jimmy Johnson.  Safe, as a teacher, means following the norms.  First week of school, repeat ad nauseum the rules regarding pencil sharpening and bathroom passes.  This is the standard almost all teachers follow.  To break away from this pattern in such a radical fashion, as the author suggests, invites ridicule from students and other teachers.  However, if it works, and your students can't wait to show up in your classroom, who dares ridicule your methods?



__________________
Rita Wilcox
Eillian

Registered:
Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #13 
My biggest "ah-ha" moment came at the end of the book in the "Where Do I Start" chapter.  Summer is a great time for me to re-focus and re-set.  As I read his thoughts on the fear of failure and just getting started and DOING, I realized that a lot of my teaching/professional life is hindered by "What If" thoughts.  What if I try this and my principle walks in the room and it is tanking?  What if I respond MY way to students and the grumpy guses roll their eyes?  What if I do it my way and my STAAR results are miserable...?  
I know that I am great with the kids and great at teaching.  I have to get that momentum going and not look back.  I need to accept failure as a step to greater success!  
The Immersion chapter began with the quote, "Do whatever you do intensely." That will be my motto this year!

Thank you, Ms. Susong!  I enjoyed this book immensely and appreciate the opportunity to receive CPEs for it!


__________________
Erin Illian
22209

Registered:
Posts: 65
Reply with quote  #14 
My biggest "a-ha" moment was thinking about the classroom as a stage that can be changed out daily, moved around, etc. & the creativity that I need to display as a teacher. I think sometimes I get so caught up in trying to teach concepts "well", that I forget to relax and have fun with it all! I have forgotten what it is like to be in the "audience" daily, and I forget that I truly am in a public speaking role as a teacher. This book has challenged me and given me motivation to incorporate more hooks into my lessons, to think outside the box and get creative, and to regain passion & enthusiasm for teaching. I feel overwhelmed about starting these changes though, and I'm grateful for his section devoted to killing those lies that I buy into about that. 

My favorite quote was actually the entire section about "Play Your Drum" on p. 151/152. I have gone my entire life without really analyzing the lyrics to that familiar carol. He inspired me through his explanation of it. Like he said previously in the book, "When you have a high calling, it is much easier to commit yourself to doing whatever it takes to accomplish your life's purpose. You have to decide if what you're doing is worth your complete effort and full attention. If it is, don't let anything stop you." 
Rocastillo

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #15 
My biggest "a-ha" moment was on pages 162-166, the incident about the WASC visit.  I have had the experience at different districts that district administration did not want elementary students coloring or drawing even if it was tied to the curriculum because it was a waste of instructional time.  I do not agree with this and believe that students of all ages should be able to draw or color to aid their comprehension of topics. 

Next school year I plan to make my lessons more interesting and engaging by using various hooks that will work with the subject.

My favorite quote is " I not only use all the brains that I have, but all the brains that I can borrow." Woodrow Wilson pg. 169.

__________________
RoCastillo
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.