Forum
Register  |   |   |  Calendar  |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 3      Prev   1   2   3   Next
tamram

Registered:
Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #16 
After finishing the details about about classroom management, I consider the warm-up to be critical, also.

My students picked up a daily work tally form as they entered. The first task listed on the form was a warm-up also available at the door. The tally form served as an agenda and choice sheet for the day. Except for concept introductions and question and answer time, the students chose the order in which they completed the tasks. As I passed through the room, I placed a stamp on the student's sheet to indicate the completion of a task. For example, during an explanation students had to ask a question or make a comment to receive stamp on their sheet.  

We had block periods so the tally forms represented a variety of activities that could be completed in 90 minutes: two notes on a short video, a foldable, a set of problems, problem review and note-taking during a class discussion. The tally sheets and work were handed in at the end of class. The daily grade was based on the number of stamps. Also, the tally forms allowed me to easily assess progress as I passed through the room.

__________________
Tamra M.
M/S H/S Math Teacher
lmarvels

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #17 

On page 180 in the text, Working in Groups, is procedure that I currently use in my classroom. Some educators do not like using collaborative work assignments because they are afraid that they will lose control of the classroom. I on the other hand think that it is important for students to learn how to work effectively in groups not only for academic achievement but it is a skill they will need throughout life.

Usually I meet and greet students at the door when they are transitioning from class to class. Since my lessons are planned I know in advance if they are going to be working in groups. I stand at the door greeting students and have them select a Popsicle stick with a word on it. Once everyone is in the classroom they are instructed to find the person that has the synonym or definition of the word that they are holding. These words come from the unit we are currently working on or figurative language terms that we have gone over. This is a way of spiraling back in that information and selecting their groups for them so that students do not feel left out or pair up with their best friend and get distracted.

The students will work in desks side by side. They are aware of this because this is something we rehearse at the beginning of school. They are also aware of what level they are to speak in when they are working together.

When it is time for students to transition back into their normal seating they will hear music as a cue to wrap up their group work. They place their seats back into the seating arrangement and put up all materials being used.

In a high school classroom setting this seem to work pretty well for me.

Someone named Don Tapscott once said, “Collaboration is important not just because it's a better way to learn. The spirit of collaboration is penetrating every institution and all of our lives. So learning to collaborate is part of equipping yourself for effectiveness, problem solving, innovation and life-long learning in an ever-changing networked economy.” 

lmarvels

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #18 
I like the idea of using an APP. This is something that might be able to work in a high school classroom and take up less time. 




Quote:
Originally Posted by theteach
Out of all of the procedures listed, the only one I have been consistent about and happy to share about is the working in groups.  I created this procedure for myself in my second year of teaching math and science. 
I was introduced to the "Who's Next" app at a training and use it to create random groups.  I have also used stickers and puzzle pieces to group students before.
I use group work when I am wanting students to create a project, response, or practice a skill.  I take a grade for the assignment and a participation grade.  The following is how I take a participation grade with working in groups.
Once the students are in the groups, one person is assigned a responsibility.  One has to be time keeper, one is the encourager/on topic person, one is the recorder, and one is the materials person. 
Each group is provided 4 smiley face/frown face flip cards. (Smiley face on one side, frown face on the other side).  Students are told that there are three reasons I will flip over their card: 1) talking too loudly, 2) not all classmates are on working on assignment, or 3) off topic.
Students are also told that each card is worth 10 points each.  So they start with a 100 for participation, and each time a card is flipped over they loose 10 points with a 60 as the lowest possible grade.  Once it is flipped over, they can't earn the points back.  They learn to be responsible for working together as a group and staying focused.
Students can earn a 0 if they can't work at all as a group after the 4 flips of the card AND teacher discussion.  They earn a zero on the assignment AND in the participation grade.  I have only had this happen once, and I provided the students a make up assignment to complete.
I walk around and monitor that they are following the three rules.  This allows for me to assist them on the work if needed and to stop negative behavior before it begins.
I have to admit that with GT students, they have a very difficult time with this concept and they find it very unfair if they don't earn a 100 as their participation grade.  I have even had parents get upset about it, but I simply inform the parent and the child that this activity required working together, showing respect, and caring about coming up with a shared answer. 
sdcatoe

Registered:
Posts: 18
Reply with quote  #19 

Our Physical Education classes can have anywhere between 45-98 students in the class period with 2 coaches.  On the first day of classes we instruct the students that we will use eyes.  Coach or I will say "eyes" and then the class will repeat "eyes". This way they know that they need to turn their attention to the teacher for information.  Even if a student is toward the back of the group and may not have heard the teacher, the student will have heard the rest of the class repeat "eyes" and focus their attention to the teacher.  We have found that this is a great way to get the class' attention while saving ones voice when the teacher has 7 classes a day. 


We also go over if there is an emergency and what to do.  With as many students as we have in the open gym, we must have a way to direct the classes as quickly as possible in the event of an emergency.  Two short whistles means to stop, go on one knee for directions.  Three whistles means to freeze and listen. 
Three whistles is used in the event of an emergency (fire drill, bad weather drill, lock down, someone is hurt, etc.).  In the event of bad weather or lock down of any kind, we teach the students to immediately go to the designated locker room with one coach while the other coach will lock down everything in the gym and turn off the lights in the gym.   (If there is a sub the students know that both classes will be in the same area for lock down.) In the event of evacuation (Fire) drill, the students know to exit out of the south part of the gym and line up alphabetically so that we can verify everyone is there quickly.   

Our school also has an emergency response team (ERT).  As a participant of this team, we may be called to a different area in the building and using the whistle system to quickly get the attention of the students and inform them to report to the other coach is instrumental.  If there is an emergency inside of the gym, using the whistle system can quickly get things going.  We can instruct students where to move, send someone to get the AED, get the nurse, etc. 


__________________
StephC.
Sharon

Registered:
Posts: 57
Reply with quote  #20 


Of all the procedures mentioned in pages 112-207, which do you currently use and feel is the most successful in your classroom? Why?

Please describe what you specifically do in your classroom for this procedure (this will help everyone understand and maybe even spark an idea for the participants). 

The description of the principal quieting an auditorium is the closest to what I do. My sentence is "Okay it's my time." Then I wait silently 'until they are quiet. 

Of course every year I have a little (big) Johnny or little Jill, and they push the limits until they see that I don't rattle, and that I do care about them. 

This goes straight to the heart of one of my teaching philosophies. Students generally show you as much respect as you show them. When they do realize that I care, my Johnny and Jill calm down. I rarely send kids to the office or even give them detention. An added perk when you do send one our principal knows it's serious.

I really enjoyed the different techniques and I may pick a different technique this year such as the sign language. I can see high school kiddos enjoying this. I am not sure about changing because my technique has been so successful.

Sharon

Registered:
Posts: 57
Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tamram
After finishing the details about about classroom management, I consider the warm-up to be critical, also.

My students picked up a daily work tally form as they entered. The first task listed on the form was a warm-up also available at the door. The tally form served as an agenda and choice sheet for the day. Except for concept introductions and question and answer time, the students chose the order in which they completed the tasks. As I passed through the room, I placed a stamp on the student's sheet to indicate the completion of a task. For example, during an explanation students had to ask a question or make a comment to receive stamp on their sheet.  

We had block periods so the tally forms represented a variety of activities that could be completed in 90 minutes: two notes on a short video, a foldable, a set of problems, problem review and note-taking during a class discussion. The tally sheets and work were handed in at the end of class. The daily grade was based on the number of stamps. Also, the tally forms allowed me to easily assess progress as I passed through the room.


We had block scheduling until two years ago when the district decided our math would benefit from a traditional schedule. I miss those blocks and I thought this was excellent in one way for the students heading to college. Kuddos to you. 
8thgradeteacher

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #22 
There are several procedures that are mentioned in our book that I use on a daily basis in my 8th grade computer lab (and many new ones that I plan to use in the fall!):

1.  Emergency Preparedness - my district places a lot of emphasis on emergency drills.  From tornado drills to lock-down drills, we have procedures that must be followed by both teachers and students to ensure effectiveness and safety.  During the first week of school, I teach my students the procedures for the various drills and we practice them.  One of the drills requires us to remove chairs from a corner of the room and be seated on the floor under the tables while remaining absolutely silent.  In a room of 25 active 8th graders, this can be a very interesting task!  We discuss how we will move, who will remove the chairs, the importance of moving quietly and quickly, and most importantly, why it is important that we all cooperate and be consistent in how we move to our spot.  Students are understandably nervous when it comes to drills because they aren't quite sure if this is the real thing or just a drill.  I tell my students to assume that it is not a drill and to act accordingly.  Rehearsing the various drills removes most of the anxiety and stress that occurs when the drills happen.

2.  Bathroom Breaks - Over the past 4 years in my classroom, I have struggled with bathroom and hall passes.  In previous years, I would create cute laminated passes only to find that they disappear quickly because they are stuffed into kids' pockets or left in the bathrooms for long periods (gross!). This past year, I created 2 bathroom passes (one for ladies and one for gentlemen) and a hall pass and my husband glued each of them inside a hard plastic frame.  I hang them on hooks near the door and the cords are long enough that many students "wear them" (which reduces the "gross" factor).  If a student needs to use the restroom, they must turn off their monitor (so I can see at a glance who is missing and I immediately know where they are) and they quietly get up, sign my restroom log, pick up one of the two restroom passes and leave the classroom. Only one girl and one boy can leave the room at a time.  At the beginning of the year, I went through the procedure with the students and taught them to look at the passes before getting up to see if the bathroom pass they need is already in use by another student.

The hall pass cannot be used without talking to me first. A student may quietly come to my desk and ask permission to leave the classroom.  Only one student may leave the classroom with the hall pass.  

I tell students at the beginning of the year that I monitor the restroom log to check for "frequent flyers" and will impose limits if needed.  During this past year, I only had a few students who misused the restroom procedures and these were handled in a private conference with the students and limits were imposed on these students.  For the most part, students love the fact that they are empowered to handle their restroom needs quietly without having to disturb me or other students.

 
 



__________________
 
OnaBethDay

Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #23 
It is so important that the students know where to turn in assignments: I have a tray for each period and also a tray for missed work.
__________________
Ona Beth Day 
eleight

Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Of all the procedures mentioned in pages 112-207, which do you currently use and feel is the most successful in your classroom? Why?

It didn't start out this way last year, but by the end of the year one of the most effective procedures I used was getting students' attention.  I started out with a procedure other teachers at the school used -- one where I said a phrase, and then the students responded.  This just didn't work well for me for quieting down my classes.  I switched to "Give me 5", with my hand held up, and counting down at a normal tone of voice.   I had a fairly immediate improvement, giving the 8th graders a chance to finish their sentences before being quiet.  Then I finally got good at not speaking until everyone was quiet, and the amount of time it took for all students to be quiet in the room really decreased.  I'll definitely start with this next year, and be calm but firm about not speaking until everyone is paying attention.  This also decreased the number of times I had to repeat instructions for an activity, so wasted less time for both me and the students.

I think for next year, I'm going to use the non-verbal signals for getting out of seats.  Most students just started defaulting to pointing to the bathroom pass to ask to go, so formalizing that and signals for pencils, etc. should be a fairly easy transition and reduce disruptions.
tmcham

Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #25 
One procedure I have used for several years is mentioned on page 178.  I always put my students names on the larger craft sticks and place them in a cup to use when teaching in a whole class setting or even in a small group setting, if necessary.  This procedure eliminates the problem with students talking out of turn or possibly being overlooked because they do not want to participate.  I really like that it ensures that all students are eventually called on and are given the opportunity to answer questions or participate in the activity or discussion.  I think it makes the students pay better attention because they know, at some point, they are going to be called on to answer or participate.  It also helps to eliminate the problem with some students calling out or raising their hand to participate too much.  

I also use this procedure to form groups when I need to quickly divide the students up.  They just cannot argue with the names being drawn out of the cup so the students are more compliant with discussions and group formations.  I saw this procedure when I was student teaching many years ago and it has been one of the best things I have carried over to my classrooms.

Amancillas

Registered:
Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #26 
Getting students' attention was one procedure that I used consistently at the last school I taught at. Our school district worked very closely with Spence Rogers (PEAK Learning Systems), and implemented a school-wide procedure for getting students' attention. No matter what class they were in or if they were in the cafeteria or an assembly, when an adult raised their hand and said "I need your help," the students knew that was their cue to raise their hand and give their attention to the adult. It was great that it was the same procedure across the school.
CharlotteL

Registered:
Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #27 
I think the most successful procedure in my classroom last year would be classroom jobs.   The students were extremely excited each week to change jobs and they always looked forward to the larger ones.  I had a chart up on the wall with pictures/names of each job.  I would rotate it clockwise so each student had the opportunity to have each one. One of the favorite jobs were  the bell ringer.  This student had a bell and chimes at their desk.  When the classroom was called to attention or too loud they would ring the bell for me.  Also the classroom nurse, they kept band  aids & nurse passes at their desk.  Another favorite was the lunch wagon.  This student pushed the wagon down to lunch and returned it to class after recess.  I will continue it as it empowered students  and to feel part of the classroom.  I have read all the other procedures and I am excited to incorporate the ones I'm not using currently in my class this year.
BurntOrangeStrong

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by msusong

Of all the procedures mentioned in pages 112-207, which do you currently use and feel is the most successful in your classroom? Why?

Please describe what you specifically do in your classroom for this procedure (this will help everyone understand and maybe even spark an idea for the participants). 



Procedure 33, Students Correcting Work, found on page 200 in The Classroom Management Book was an integral procedure that I used for my 6th grade math class this year.  I have to admit, this procedure underwent several manifestations before I finally settled on one that felt served my students the best.  One idea from the book that I will utilize starting next year will be using one color rather than allowing students to use any color marker.

My grading procedure is quite different than what the book suggest, though.  Rather than grading assignments, we've shifted our perceptions on regular daily assignments.  Now, we view first attempts at learning as a rough draft where the focus is on showing the work and attempting every problem even if students are unsure if they are correct.  This encourages effort while discouraging tentativeness over attempting challenging problems.  

Therefore, when students check over their partners work we call it editing.  Students are looking for mistakes in the work and the answers and circling the mistakes for their partners.  If students are missing work then they don't receive credit for the answer.  However, if students show their work for each problem then they still receive full credit for the problem.  This way, students are provided with quick feedback on their mistakes and have an opportunity to learn from them before a mastery check (quiz) is given to them.   

Students that are editing write their names on the paper once they have finished editing as a way to verify their accuracy.  I like to have students do this at the end because it makes them think again about how well they've edited a partners work.  Because it's a rough draft we mark all over the papers.  We use check marks to verify that a problem was worked out perfectly.  We leave little notes and suggestions for our partners.  We look for mistakes to circle so that each student can learn from their mistakes.  Editing in this way has really helped students clarify misunderstandings.

Once finished, the edited rough drafts are returned to the student for a 5 minute review period.  During this time, I field questions from the students and rework any problems that are causing confusion.  

Once we've addressed any learning issues, the table captain collects their table's work, arranges the papers in the same direction and checks for headings and proper editing notations.  Then they bring their stack of papers to me and I say "thank you."

I check over the work that day and return the drafts the following day using a return procedure.  Next year, I am considering allowing students to use their rough drafts on the mastery check.  I'm also considering letting the students keep the drafts until the day of the exam when they would create a draft booklet to turn in all at one time.  This way the students would have their feedback to utilize for studying and it would cut down on the paper work I deal with on a daily basis. 

mewisl

Registered:
Posts: 148
Reply with quote  #29 
The procedure that I use year after year is  set place to turn work into me.  I know that I have used this procedure effectively since former students' are now telling their children there is no excuse for me not getting a completed paper.  I give a time limit on how long they have to complete a paper.  At the end of that time, I call students up one by one.  Any unfinished papers are immediately put into a "I need to finish" folder. The procedure goes quickly because students know that I will call them in the same order every time.  This allows me to alphabetize all assignments for easier grading and inputting into the computer. 
OnaBethDay

Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #30 
Question 3-Procedures that I use, feel comfortable with and implement easily: The procedure I have in place that works the best for my students is how to work in the classroom. Why are we here? We are here to learn-Our objective today is- We will ... And you will know you are successful because ...
Having classroom job works well for my classroom as well. My students love to do their jobs. I give them an opportunity to pick their own jobs or to create a new one.


__________________
Ona Beth Day 
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.