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msusong

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Reply with quote  #1 

Of all the procedures mentioned in pages 112-207, which do you currently use and feel is the most successful in your classroom? Why?

Please describe what you specifically do in your classroom for this procedure (this will help everyone understand and maybe even spark an idea for the participants). 



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Maggie Susong
ATPE Member Engagement Coordinator
theteach

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #2 
Out of all of the procedures listed, the only one I have been consistent about and happy to share about is the working in groups.  I created this procedure for myself in my second year of teaching math and science. 
I was introduced to the "Who's Next" app at a training and use it to create random groups.  I have also used stickers and puzzle pieces to group students before.
I use group work when I am wanting students to create a project, response, or practice a skill.  I take a grade for the assignment and a participation grade.  The following is how I take a participation grade with working in groups.
Once the students are in the groups, one person is assigned a responsibility.  One has to be time keeper, one is the encourager/on topic person, one is the recorder, and one is the materials person. 
Each group is provided 4 smiley face/frown face flip cards. (Smiley face on one side, frown face on the other side).  Students are told that there are three reasons I will flip over their card: 1) talking too loudly, 2) not all classmates are on working on assignment, or 3) off topic.
Students are also told that each card is worth 10 points each.  So they start with a 100 for participation, and each time a card is flipped over they loose 10 points with a 60 as the lowest possible grade.  Once it is flipped over, they can't earn the points back.  They learn to be responsible for working together as a group and staying focused.
Students can earn a 0 if they can't work at all as a group after the 4 flips of the card AND teacher discussion.  They earn a zero on the assignment AND in the participation grade.  I have only had this happen once, and I provided the students a make up assignment to complete.
I walk around and monitor that they are following the three rules.  This allows for me to assist them on the work if needed and to stop negative behavior before it begins.
I have to admit that with GT students, they have a very difficult time with this concept and they find it very unfair if they don't earn a 100 as their participation grade.  I have even had parents get upset about it, but I simply inform the parent and the child that this activity required working together, showing respect, and caring about coming up with a shared answer. 

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Angela R Ritter
4th Grade Writing Teacher
jgoedken123

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Posts: 42
Reply with quote  #3 
I teach at a small behavioral school the class sizes are small, I teach multiple subjects during the same class period, and the academic gap between students is vast.  So I have to have a procedure for "finishing work early" covered on page 154 - 157.  My students know they have many options if they complete their work early in my class as I am often working one-on-one with another student.  They know they may a.  (my favorite) offer their services as a peer tutor to aid another student who needs assistance.  b.  Go on the cool math website (which is a fun activity for them) c.  further their education by going on a website that is self-paced; or d.  challenge themselves with a packet of work I have by my classroom door.


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Jennifer Goedken
Teetime9

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Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #4 
One specific technique that I use is the waiting for students to quiet after giving them a calm, but firm, verbal cue. They know that when I have redirected them back to me that, as I say, "I have the floor," they know to focus back on me in order to move forward in the lesson or class discussion. I remind them that everyone is to give them the same respect when they "have the floor" and we practice this from the beginning of the year because I do "good things" with my students at the beginning of every class. "Good things" is a part of Capturing Kids Hearts and I have been implementing this for many years. Students are only allowed to share one good thing that has happened or that they are looking forward to each day.

I have been in numerous classes where teachers tried to speak over students by yelling or threatening many times, but never acting on it, and they were just miserable. 

Two procedures I do plan on implementing is the "used pencil", "new pencil" procedure. This has always been a pet-peeve of mine and will give this a try this upcoming year. Hopes are that it will cut down on students distracting others when needing to sharpen a pencil and maybe will cut down on having to replace pencils frequently out of my own pocket. 


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Sherry Ayres
MJML220

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #5 
I teach 7th grade Math, and we have only 45 minute classes. Students who finish their work early have a couple of options to choose from to keep them busy and utilize their time wisely. They are only allowed to work on the Math options I provide. Their first priority is to work on any correctable work. Grades below 70 may be corrected and brought up to a 70, and they have a deadline date to do so. Their next option would be to either work on Math puzzles, such as Sudoku and Qizzles that I have in folders in a file box located at the back of the classroom. They are also able to use chrome books in the classroom to work on a Math website that they receive extra credit 100's for completing specified weekly assignments. The website we have been using is thinkthroughmath.com. Next year it will probably be Study Island. I do not allow them to work on anything but Math, and I have explained to them the reason is that I am responsible for their Math performance. On Fridays, if they have everything completed and corrected, they are allowed to read if they so choose. One thing I will make sure I do this year is to make sure I have these procedures posted and explained on the first day.
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Melissa
ktymniak

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Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #6 
Classroom jobs is one of the procedures that helps the most in keeping my classroom running smoothly and in saving my sanity.  I would not have survived the past year of teaching a double load if I hadn't used this practice.  I tell new teachers over and over, "never do anything a student can do legally and almost as well as you. "

I teach high school and I teach French, so I have many of my students for two - four years.

I have some behavior challenges but most respond to my procedures and we get along great.

However, I teach seven different levels of French.  This means every class is a new prep and I have a lot of prep work.

I talk to them about the fact that they took this class because they wanted to learn French.  They could learn French on the internet without a teacher and, as a teacher, I cannot  make them learn, but I am there to help them learn.  We also talk about that fact that although I am in the classroom all day, it is also their classroom that they share with the other periods. I tell them that I love teaching, but there are a lot of bits and pieces that are part of my job that can take away from my time directly working with my students and helping them to progress. 

I do not assign jobs and I do not rotate jobs.  Students volunteer for activities they want to help with.  They may change jobs at anytime by resigning their job during "Housekeeping minutes" which take place towards the end of class. I then ask for another volunteer.  I have rarely not had anyone volunteer.  Usually they negotiate among themselves when they want a job or more than one person wants the job.

Examples of student jobs:

Attendance taker:  I verify and enter attendance in computer.

Homework checker.

Area peer tutor.

Accuracy checker on assignments.  (They can only say if an answer is correct or incorrect - not give the answer.)

Paper returner: - enters classroom early, gets papers from class folder and places them on desks.

Creating assignment packets for absent students.

Posting assignments daily to the class website.

Writing and scheduling daily Cel.ly (or Remind 101) text message about homework or upcoming quiz or test.

Writing daily email message to parents about homework or upcoming quiz or test.

Cleanliness monitor:  one for each side of the classroom - verifies no one has left any belonging or trash before the bell rings.

Passing out wipes for desks in last class on Friday.

Setting up tray and passing out napkins for "cheese of the week" in French 4 or "pastry of the week" in French 5.

French 1 and 2 have assigned seats and pass their papers in in alphabetical order.  French 3, 4, and 5 have an alphabetizer to put papers in order.

Reservation specialist: reserves library time, computer lab time, mobile computer carts.
In the upper levels, they also make the reservations for the field trip each semester.  This includes the bus, the museum, and the restaurant.

Bell warner: holds up fingers to remind me we have 3 minutes left.  This gives me time to wrap up and then time for the students to put their work away correctly rather than hurriedly jamming it into their back pack.

CD worker:  If I am using a CD for listening practice or a quiz, student gets correct CD and find the correct track. (This is written on the board within the daily schedule.) This person also pauses the cd when needed since my remote no longer works and I don't like being tied to the machine.

Window blind monitor:  Raises or lowers the blinds as needed due to current activity and glare level.

Unit project developer.

Unit vocabulary game developer.

Song chooser.  (All students submit choices to this person who looks over lyrics and speed of song to check suitability.)

Some of these jobs are very small. Some are large. Some of them are particular to an upper level foreign language classroom.  Many of them I do have to check over occasionally. Some I have to check and verify for accuracy on a legal basis.  But most of this stuff is just taken care of for me and in order to have the class run smoothly. For the those activities I have to check, even having part of the job done saves me time and energy to work on developing engaging activities and lessons for seven different preps and actually teaching.


__________________
Karen Tymniak
   "On ne voit bien qu'avec le coeur."

   "One only sees well with the heart."
        Antoine de Saint-Exupery
OnaBethDay

Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktymniak
Classroom jobs is one of the procedures that helps the most in keeping my classroom running smoothly and in saving my sanity.  I would not have survived the past year of teaching a double load if I hadn't used this practice.  I tell new teachers over and over, "never do anything a student can do legally and almost as well as you. "

I teach high school and I teach French, so I have many of my students for two - four years.

I have some behavior challenges but most respond to my procedures and we get along great.

However, I teach seven different levels of French.  This means every class is a new prep and I have a lot of prep work.

I talk to them about the fact that they took this class because they wanted to learn French.  They could learn French on the internet without a teacher and, as a teacher, I cannot  make them learn, but I am there to help them learn.  We also talk about that fact that although I am in the classroom all day, it is also their classroom that they share with the other periods. I tell them that I love teaching, but there are a lot of bits and pieces that are part of my job that can take away from my time directly working with my students and helping them to progress. 

I do not assign jobs and I do not rotate jobs.  Students volunteer for activities they want to help with.  They may change jobs at anytime by resigning their job during "Housekeeping minutes" which take place towards the end of class. I then ask for another volunteer.  I have rarely not had anyone volunteer.  Usually they negotiate among themselves when they want a job or more than one person wants the job.

Examples of student jobs:

Attendance taker:  I verify and enter attendance in computer.

Homework checker.

Area peer tutor.

Accuracy checker on assignments.  (They can only say if an answer is correct or incorrect - not give the answer.)

Paper returner: - enters classroom early, gets papers from class folder and places them on desks.

Creating assignment packets for absent students.

Posting assignments daily to the class website.

Writing and scheduling daily Cel.ly (or Remind 101) text message about homework or upcoming quiz or test.

Writing daily email message to parents about homework or upcoming quiz or test.

Cleanliness monitor:  one for each side of the classroom - verifies no one has left any belonging or trash before the bell rings.

Passing out wipes for desks in last class on Friday.

Setting up tray and passing out napkins for "cheese of the week" in French 4 or "pastry of the week" in French 5.

French 1 and 2 have assigned seats and pass their papers in in alphabetical order.  French 3, 4, and 5 have an alphabetizer to put papers in order.

Reservation specialist: reserves library time, computer lab time, mobile computer carts.
In the upper levels, they also make the reservations for the field trip each semester.  This includes the bus, the museum, and the restaurant.

Bell warner: holds up fingers to remind me we have 3 minutes left.  This gives me time to wrap up and then time for the students to put their work away correctly rather than hurriedly jamming it into their back pack.

CD worker:  If I am using a CD for listening practice or a quiz, student gets correct CD and find the correct track. (This is written on the board within the daily schedule.) This person also pauses the cd when needed since my remote no longer works and I don't like being tied to the machine.

Window blind monitor:  Raises or lowers the blinds as needed due to current activity and glare level.

Unit project developer.

Unit vocabulary game developer.

Song chooser.  (All students submit choices to this person who looks over lyrics and speed of song to check suitability.)

Some of these jobs are very small. Some are large. Some of them are particular to an upper level foreign language classroom.  Many of them I do have to check over occasionally. Some I have to check and verify for accuracy on a legal basis.  But most of this stuff is just taken care of for me and in order to have the class run smoothly. For the those activities I have to check, even having part of the job done saves me time and energy to work on developing engaging activities and lessons for seven different preps and actually teaching.


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Ona Beth Day 
mmlillie

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Posts: 44
Reply with quote  #8 
In our preK class, we had half our students choose jobs every day: 2 table helpers, 1 door holder, 1 caboose, 1 weather person, 1 calendar helper, 1 story helper (we listened to a story at the beginning of rest time), 1 line leader, 1 prayer leader, and  1 flag holder.  We had 20 kiddos in the class and 10 jobs, so on Monday we would randomly select 10 kids' names, hold them up one at a time, and have that child choose from the jobs available.  If a child didn't get a job that day, he/she knew that they would get one the next day.  The 10 alternated (Monday, Wed, Fri the 1st group of 10 got jobs; T and Th the second group).  Then the next week the random selection started all over again.

This worked very well in several ways.  First, it taught the kids patience: sometimes they had to wait to get a job, but that was ok because they were guaranteed one the next day.  They also loved the variety... they didn't get "stuck" with a job they didn't like for an entire week.  We found that it was a good incentive to help behavior-challenging kids pay attention and get in their spots on the carpet at circle time because they didn't want to be deprived of the opportunity to select a job they liked. 

msusong

Moderator
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Posts: 122
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theteach
Out of all of the procedures listed, the only one I have been consistent about and happy to share about is the working in groups.  I created this procedure for myself in my second year of teaching math and science. 
I was introduced to the "Who's Next" app at a training and use it to create random groups.  I have also used stickers and puzzle pieces to group students before.
I use group work when I am wanting students to create a project, response, or practice a skill.  I take a grade for the assignment and a participation grade.  The following is how I take a participation grade with working in groups.
Once the students are in the groups, one person is assigned a responsibility.  One has to be time keeper, one is the encourager/on topic person, one is the recorder, and one is the materials person. 
Each group is provided 4 smiley face/frown face flip cards. (Smiley face on one side, frown face on the other side).  Students are told that there are three reasons I will flip over their card: 1) talking too loudly, 2) not all classmates are on working on assignment, or 3) off topic.
Students are also told that each card is worth 10 points each.  So they start with a 100 for participation, and each time a card is flipped over they loose 10 points with a 60 as the lowest possible grade.  Once it is flipped over, they can't earn the points back.  They learn to be responsible for working together as a group and staying focused.
Students can earn a 0 if they can't work at all as a group after the 4 flips of the card AND teacher discussion.  They earn a zero on the assignment AND in the participation grade.  I have only had this happen once, and I provided the students a make up assignment to complete.
I walk around and monitor that they are following the three rules.  This allows for me to assist them on the work if needed and to stop negative behavior before it begins.
I have to admit that with GT students, they have a very difficult time with this concept and they find it very unfair if they don't earn a 100 as their participation grade.  I have even had parents get upset about it, but I simply inform the parent and the child that this activity required working together, showing respect, and caring about coming up with a shared answer. 


Thanks for sharing the details of this procedure. It looks as if you have a nice system going that seems to be effective!

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Maggie Susong
ATPE Member Engagement Coordinator
TXnature1

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #10 
There are many procedures I use on a daily basis. These are a few I love and wouldn't teach without. 
Morning Meeting: When it is time to gather for the morning meeting, I play a song (One Earth, I'm Amazing by Keb Mo, You've Got A Friend In Me, Wonderful World, etc.). When kids hear the music they know it is time to clean up and gather 'under the tree' in the morning meeting spot where they can talk quietly or sing along. When the song is finished they are expected to be in a spot and sitting quietly. We discuss the theme for the week, things good friends do, things good friends say, how to be a bucket filler, tell about someone who filled their bucket with a kind act or kind words, upcoming events, problems/solutions, etc. etc. as needed. Of course not everything every day - but a few topics that are relevant. Then this time transitions into a read-aloud and 'book talk' using comprehension strategies and reinforcing CAFE reading strategies.
Pencil Bags: Seeing broken, gnawed pencils at the end of the day was my pet peeve. SO I started using pencil bags. At the beginning of the year each kid gets a zippered pencil bag with their name on it and 5 sharpened yellow pencils. At the end of the day on Friday they turn in their pencil bag, then, I open the bags, sharpen pencils as needed, and IF they still have their 5 yellow pencils (in good shape with no chewing or biting) they get a prize (something small/inexpensive such as a sticker, a fun eraser, a stamp, etc.). If they have not taken care and not been responsible to still have their 5 pencils, then they do not get a prize- but I make sure they have 5 yellow sharpened pencils to start their week off on Monday which gives them the opportunity to try again. The student who is the 'Pencil Bag Helper' comes in Monday morn and places the bags on each student's desk. Also, kids love specialty pencils so this enables them to keep that special birthday or Christmas pencil safe.  Here are some of the other benefits: I only sharpen pencils one time a week, most pencils are still in good shape, it teaches responsibility, when we go outside-to the science lab-partner work-math games-Daily 5 writing-etc. they take their pencil bag and they are prepared to write and work with little fuss (if a pencil breaks they simply get out a different one). On Monday kids are excited to see their pencil bag prize. Kids that didn't get a prize are encouraged to try again and be responsible. Tricky Teacher Tip: If many kids are getting lax and not taking care of their pencils - instead of griping (which doesn't work) use a really super exciting prize (small playdough, scented marker) so on Monday the kids that got a prize are super excited and talking about it - everyone will be trying harder to take care of their pencils anticipating what the next prize will be [wink]  
Daily 5: aka- Read Any Place Time: I use Daily 5 as a structure for my ELA block. The best way to grow better readers is to give them TIME and the structure and the procedures to READ. Read to Self (with students choosing where to sit) is a daily occurrence and is not in full swing (15-20 mins. in 1st grade) until we have practiced, practiced, practiced using the '10 Steps to Independence' and building their reading stamina to gradually get to 20 mins while keeping true to the procedure and high expectations. "Perfect practice makes perfect"     

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[thumb] No Child Left Inside
22209

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Posts: 65
Reply with quote  #11 
This book would have been so helpful to me as a first year teacher! Over the years, I managed to figure out these procedures HAD to happen and be taught at the beginning of the school year in order for me to run a successful classroom. This is utterly embarrassing, but before I knew how to truly help kids have a clean desk continuously and set that procedure in motion from day 1, I made a huge mistake. I ran out of time to have my kids clean up their desks before Open House. I didn't want to appear like I was a teacher without procedures, so I tidied up their desks before the parents came that evening FOR them! I still am in shock that I did that in my moment of desperation. When one of the children called me out on it in front of the parents in the classroom, I was mortified. From then on, I realized how important desk cleanliness procedures were! If only I had known from the start to set procedures on broken pencils, getting students attention, missing assignments. etc. instead of "winging" it as I went along....a lot of wasted time and stress would have been saved!

One of the procedures that is a must have for me is students knowing what to do when they finish work early! I love students being able to independently move on after their assignment has been completed without me having to answer the question, "I'm finished. What do I do now?" repeatedly OR the frustration that comes with looking over at a student to find them doing absolutely nothing because, "They are finished and I hadn't told them anything else to do." This allows me time to float around the classroom and pull kids for reteaching more easily. In my first years of teaching, I had my students read a lot of books when they were  finished. Not that there is anything wrong with reading, but....it wasn't appropriate for my gifted and talented cluster to always have to read when finished. Then, I came up with the idea of "Early Finisher Folders." I printed out tic-tac-toe grids of fun, creative things for the students to do when finished with assignments early, such as writing poetry or creating images with pattern blocks. I laminated these folders and allowed the students to keep their incomplete/completed early finisher work in them. Once they had made a "tic-tac-toe," they could turn them in to the finished assignment tray for a prize. I also started making the center square an extension square. Each day, I would put an extension for at least one subject on the board in order to further promote differentiation. The students could pick any of these assignments for the extension square on their tic-tac-toe board. The students really loved and enjoyed getting to do something when finished besides just reading books (although reading books was always an option too!). It was so fun to see what the students would come up with too for the assignments. Now that I teach pre-k, I run my classroom a little differently for early finishers. Instead of completing assignments in an early finisher folder, I let them engage in learning centers. They are allowed to go to any of the learning centers that I have set up around the classroom, such as practicing writing letters with laminated tracing pages and dry erase markers, playing with tangrams/pattern blocks, reading class books we have created, lacing activities, counting activities, cutting activities, etc. Each day I try to rotate out just a few of the centers....so that most are familiar, but there is always something new to try out too.
raclark

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Posts: 95
Reply with quote  #12 
Students turn in assignments to the Red Bin.  I have a red plastic tub at the front of the classroom.  Students know that everything they turn in to me gets turned in at that location.  I teach 6 classes per day and so after each class, I clip all of the papers together and place them in an organizer with a shelf for each class.  Lost papers are a thing of the past as long as I stick with this method.  I can confidently tell students that I did not get their paper and to check their backpacks for it.  This usually happens for students that may have been absent on the day the assignment was turned in.

I am intrigued with the method for collecting papers that involves students organizing their papers as they turn them in to me and possibly adding a number to them.  I teach high school and did not think this would be feasible but now I will reconsider this.  My students sit at tables, so I would have to think about how to make this work.

I have a bin at the front of the class that contains all of the work that we have done in class for a particular unit.  Students know they can go to the bin to collect work they missed after an absence.
naletta

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Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #13 
Although I had taught for fifteen years, after taking a break for five, it seems last year I forgot everything I used to do to help my classroom run smoothly.  After a very difficult year, I am super happy to be starting a new year knowing what procedures I need in place.

I can't even say that there is one procedure that is the most important.  Having the procedures in place is the most important thing.  I know that my class this year will have procedures to rehearse for the first day.

Last year, one of the big problems was horribly messy desks.  I teach second grade and I understand having a few students who have out of control desks but this year it was an epidemic!  I love the idea of the procedure for unfinished work.  I had a folder in their desk but it didn't work very well.  I think I will give the idea of a file folder a try.  It will make it much easier for me to see right away who is missing what and be able to enforce finishing work at recess time if need be.

I also have a desk fairy who visits my students.  She rewards students who have clean desks with a small gift like a pencil.  My class last year even wrote her notes.

The absent work folder is a great idea.  I started doing something like that last year and it worked really well.  I love the idea of having a seat partner gather the work.  That sounds like a great addition.  I'll be trying that as well!

A procedure that worked well for me last year was how we switched literature stations.  I would ring a bell, the students would clean up and stand by their desks.  I would call on a couple of students to tell me what they did.  Then we would switch to the next station.  I started it late in the year, but it worked well.  Beginning this at the beginning should make for a much smoother transitions from the beginning.

I use the pocket chart idea too.  I have their lunch cards and library cards in them.  That way they are organized and the students are in charge of them.

I think the biggest change I am making for next year is having the procedures and the consistency in place.  I want a classroom climate of respect.  I am going to teach manners.  I feel like many children aren't being taught that and it's making life more difficult.  I have always lined my students up at dismissal and taught them how to shake hands.  I'm going to continue this and more.  Cooperation and caring will be our motto.

Here's to a fabulous next year with Mrs. Galbraith's Shining Stars

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Naletta
sklearner2011

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Posts: 94
Reply with quote  #14 

If I had to choose just one of the following, it would be the whole group discussion procedure.  Mainly because each of us has a desire to be heard and this is a good platform to make sure no one is missed, learn to take turns, and to listen to what others have to say.

Classroom discussions
:

Before starting a classroom discussion it would be idea to practice what this looks and sounds like.  Also, I talk about how valuable each student's input is even when we may not agree with it. 

I use the tongue suppressor sticks with student names on them and draw one out and give this student the option of answering the question.  (All the names may not be called during a particular group discussion and the remaining names in the container can be pulled out during other whole group learning.)

Sometimes, I also write/paraphrasing student responses on the board and make it a point to put their first name after the response.  This gives the student a sense of pride in their response and encourages participation at later times.  It also gives the student a visual of what has already been said.  

I remind my students that it is important to listening respectfully when a classmate is speaking and that they would like the same consideration.  Of course, this takes time and patience.  It is hard not to blurt out when one is excited about sharing their ideas.

Pencil Dilemma

I work with mostly small groups of 4 to 7.  I find that having an extra set of pencils that are already sharpened and ready (just in case) is helpful.   This cuts down on time wasting and frustration.  Students are reminded to bring a pencil to small group. However, if they forget, they may borrow one of mine.  I also keep a couple of erasers on hand as well and have them out on the table.  It’s a good idea to keep a couple of hand held pencil sharpeners on hand in case no sharpened pencils are ready.

Spelling test procedures:

  1. Paper passer hands out blank paper.
  2. Each student gets a privacy guard for their test.
  3. Students number the questions.
  4. Teacher calls out the spelling words twice and uses it in a sentence.
  5. Questions for repeats are held to the end of the test.
  6. Test handed back in to designated spot.

Assigned Seating

Although I didn’t do this from the start last school year, I plan to do so for the upcoming school year.  Also with a heads up that if the seating arrangement interferes with their learning, I have the option of rearranging where students sit.  This will be a time saver and lesson disagreements of:  That’s my seat!

 

ehowe

Registered:
Posts: 83
Reply with quote  #15 
The procedures I use most successfully and consistently in my classroom are Classroom Jobs and Taking Attendance.
To make taking attendance age-appropriate for my class, I use a low bulletin board labeled Home and School. Under each label is a strip of velcro to hold a tag with each child's name and picture. After our greeting at the door, the student moves his or her name from Home to School. As we begin our morning meeting time, the Attendance helper can "read" the list of absent students to the class. The chart is also an easy visual reminder to me and my IA of how many children are with us as we walk to lunch, etc.
In our class, each child has a job every day, and those change daily. Some are bigger and more involved than others, but giving each child a job helps them feel some ownership of the classroom. Our classroom jobs include:
leader
caboose
door holder
2 flag holders
toothpaste helper
STAR helper (reminds others to relax)
2 clean up helpers
trash helper
attendance helper
daily news
ABC helper
calendar
weather reporter
schedule
substitute
caring kit
timer helper
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