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msusong

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“Digital learning has the potential to not only enhance pedagogy but also increase achievement.”  --pg. 37

After reading chapter 3, how do you plan to effectively engage digital learners in the content and process of learning?


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Maggie Susong
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ritawilcox

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Reply with quote  #2 
Fortunately every public school in Galveston ISD has a computer room available and accessible.  As an english lit teacher on occasion in the past, I have found technology is an essential part of becoming proficient at using the written word to convey ideas.  One particular method I have used personally in the past is to set up a blog through "wordpress.com".  This is a free sight that is very user friendly for setting up a daily or weekly blog, which can be connected to facebook, twitter, google, linkedin, etc.  While having each student set up an individual blog sight would be unwieldly at best, and probably largely unread; having a class set up a weekly blog as a team assignment would be a great method for learning creative writing in the 21st century.  Photographs and images are easily integrated into the writing, and groups of students can add individual paragraphs with pictures for emphasis.  The students can share on a weekly basis the things they have learned in the classroom, as well as individual experiences.  Since the blog will be open to the international public, it could become the modern version of a foreign pen pal, as students from all over the world can read and comment.  
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Rita Wilcox
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Reply with quote  #3 
Instead of assigning paper pencil homework I am going to be doing projects via Google Classroom.  I will use suggested websites platforms as noted in The Genius Hour.  If students do not have access to a computer at home I will provide them time during class/computer lab time to complete work.  As we go through the digital format I will be discussing with my students about digital citizenship and keep them cognizant of their presence on the computer.  I will also keep the parents informed of what they are doing and how they can support their children at home.  It is important that parents are aware of what the kids can do with a computer and that we, as the adults in their lives, need make sure we are teaching them in a proper use of the education tool.  
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SKDroddy
jamie

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Reply with quote  #4 
I want to use it to create videos about what they are reading.  Also use blogging to discuss books that students are reading.  Also using some polling quizzes to see if students are understanding.  It would be a very fast way to get some feedback on their understanding. I also will use it to research questions that are student created.
Crystyjohnston

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Reply with quote  #5 
Well, I must admit, I believe technology has its place, but I feel strongly about limiting students' screen time. Many of our children are getting loads of screen time at home, so I don't feel they need a whole lot at school, especially in the elementary grades. I know that my view is a minority view, but this is truly how I feel. I also feel it is sometimes taken for granted that all children have access to computers and printers at home. I know that is the case at my children' school. We have to go to my husband's office to complete some of their homework. I agree with the online polling to quickly gauge student's understanding. I also feel that using computer labs to allow students the opportunity to work on typing skills is important. Computer skills are very relevant in the real world and certainly hold students' attention. I think they also allow students to communicate with kids around the world. I would use computers to establish international pen pals.
hberdis

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I do agree with Crystyjohnston in the previous post that we need to limit student’s screen time in some instances.  I teach Office Administration to young adults in a self-paced program, and many of them can’t bear to be away from their cellphones.  Each student has a computer at their workstation for keyboarding and access to center information, but I do not give them Internet access.  There are several computers available for assignments that require access, such as learning to make airline reservations, calculating costs for shipping documents and packages, job search, etc.  Their certifications for Microsoft, IC3, etc. are also done on line. 
I am going to look into the Google Earth project in the SAMR model on page 47.

Newt82

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Reply with quote  #7 

As a substitute it is quite sporadic when it comes to technology. It really depends on the school I’m at for the day.  Though, while I read this chapter the one thought that kept popping up was when I had my first long term job. The computer the school lent me was a step above a lemon. There were a lot of times when I couldn’t even log in. At least I had my doc camera and smart board to project. Unfortunately those two hardly ever worked either. It was medieval times in the room. But the lack of technology only caused me to be more creative when it came to lesson planning. That whole experience didn’t sour me on technology in the classroom, but it did show me I cannot always rely on it. If given a choice, I would rather work with good old fashion pencil and paper.  

A lot of schools I work at have computers and IPads. I believe it is important for students to work on their keyboarding skills. Also learn the basics of how computers and the internet work. I like Crystyjohnston’s idea of international pen pals.

tugglets

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tugglets
I have the students use their cell phones frequently to look up different places that we read about in the text.  For example, a reading on Budapest mentions several tourist or historical attractions.  I tell them we are going on a virtual tour of Budapest and then have them Google (or search with their favorite engine) the places mentioned in the reading.  They enjoy this activity, and it brings the reading to life.  Often they can also watch videos.  This could be done with computers, but the cell phone is handier although it has a smaller screen.

In addition, I have some webquests that have research questions and application activities prepared for a substitute.  The students use their cell phones to research.  I only had one student without a cell phone, and he shared with a classmate.  

I also have some booklets on Switzerland that have a web address and special numbers for different topics.  I borrowed a cart of Chromebooks for the students to research the topics they were interested in before they did an application activity.  There is also a lab I can use.
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Teresa Tuggle
Amancillas

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Reply with quote  #9 
At the college I teach at, in my department, all homework and tests are completed on a web-based computer program. When I started teaching online, my biggest concern was how to answer math questions via email. I started with this pen and special notebook (I can't remember what it was called) but now use Educreations and Explain Everything to make instructional videos and to answer questions. As far as in class, I'm sure I can do more to use technology to better engage them during the class period.
jgoedken123

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Reply with quote  #10 
Digital learning has the potential to not only enhance pedagogy but also increase achievement.”  --pg. 37

After reading chapter 3, how do you plan to effectively engage digital learners in the content and process of learning

At the disciplinary center where I teach we rely on digital learning a lot!  Sometimes I have up to four different math subjects in one class period.  The program we use a lot "Edgenuity" is very interactive for my students - if they take the time to view the lecture and take notes. I've also found "Khan's Academy" and "Wolframalpha" very helpful to have students review over different concepts.  For the students who enjoy self-pace, these can especially be helpful because if they already grasp a concept they can skip ahead. 


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Jennifer Goedken
Martha_1234

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Reply with quote  #11 

“Digital learning has the potential to not only enhance pedagogy but also increase achievement.”  --pg. 37

After reading chapter 3, how do you plan to effectively engage digital learners in the content and process of learning?

This question got me thinking because this year I am getting two tablets to use in our classroom. All summer I have been asking myself,"what is the best way to integrate the tablets into the classroom?".  I want them to be a tool that can reinforce what they are learning in class, and not just a toy that keeps students busy.  I love how the author stated, "Digital technologies for learning and teaching, should be intentional and targeted, not simply tech for tech's sake." [smile] I hope to implement this by choosing sites that are educational and appropriate for my student's ages.  The main sites I plan to use are Starfall and Todo Math. Starfall is a great resource to use in lower grades because it goes through the whole alphabet and numbers 1-100. This is accomplished with tools such as songs, flashcards, and simple activities, to name a few, which target young children. In addition it allows them to work independently on activities such as calendars, seasons, a library, which will be reinforced as we work on them in class.

 


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Martha Leija McMillan
Eillian

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Reply with quote  #12 
Wow.  After reading Chapter Three, I am overwhelmed with figuring out how to get the most use out of technology in my 3rd grade classroom-it seems very complex to follow Mr. Sheninger's instructions.  I did appreciate the emphasis on making sure technology is effective in learning and that the teacher needs to be intentional in its implementation.  We'll have a new reading program via technology this year and it seems to check all of the appropriate boxes: strong assessment tools for teacher, individualized instruction to make sure each student's needs are being met as well as ease of use for the student so they can navigate successfully.
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Erin Illian
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Reply with quote  #13 
I plan on integrating effective and engaging technology in my classroom by using Google Classroom. All teachers in the district are trained in order to use the platform and my classroom will have half a class set of computers. I want to integrate technology as much as I can because it is an important and helpful tool I know adults use in their every day lives. Technology should have purpose, but sometimes I think the purpose may simply be it is quicker, easier to access, as well as preparing students for future use. With so many available resources and tools, students can easily explore knowledge and seek it out so much quicker than ever before. For example, teachers use so many digital resources to put together so many things we teach our students. My district uses Eduphoria! and records so much data with technology. Students need to use technology in class to familiarize themselves with the tools as well as having access to quickly communicate and ask questions with teachers and peers. I understand we need to learn to have real conversations and nothing can replace that; however, there is no doubt that technology is helpful if used correctly and with appropriate reason.
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Lauren Milam

blailie

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Reply with quote  #14 
I like the way my 6th grader used her tablet this past year. She would have to research topics and then had a choice of formats to use for what she would turn in for a grade...it could be a power point presentation, a digital poster, a poster made by hand, or a written or typed paper. All had to include pictures, either from the Internet or drawn by hand. I liked how the students could turn in a variety of projects, either done on their tablet or paper and pencil type.
cschneider

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Reply with quote  #15 

 

 

Posted 12 hours ago

Reply with quote  #14 


I like the way my 6th grader used her tablet this past year. She would have to research topics and then had a choice of formats to use for what she would turn in for a grade...it could be a power point presentation, a digital poster, a poster made by hand, or a written or typed paper. All had to include pictures, either from the Internet or drawn by hand. I liked how the students could turn in a variety of projects, either done on their tablet or paper and pencil type.

I really love this idea posted in our forum where a research topic was given and each student had a choice of formats to use. This is a great example of each student taking ownership in their lesson, and not creating a problem for students who have limited or no access to technology at home.  I’ve only taught in schools with low SES, so I have to always consider technology access when creating digital lessons. There are so many great ideas for incorporating technology into lessons.  As a science teacher, having students research projects, science discoveries, historical figures, and different environments online is incredibly beneficial.  A virtual tour of a particular biome (artic tundra, tropical rainforest), erosion activity, or even a space station helps students see and connect ideas to actual places and events. For controversial or current topics, I plan to incorporate rolling quizzes.  Google classroom and Skype are also at the top of my list. Using Skype to connect with other classrooms all over the world has so many benefits. Modeling the use of these tactics helps both teachers and students learn. Podcasting and blogging to listen to experts or to share personal thoughts/reflections are also digital avenues I use at home, so incorporating them into my lessons would be fun and different for students. Many of these digital tools go hand in hand with incorporating a Project-Based Learning classroom. As Sheninger states in his book about a fellow colleague, my challenge will be “instead of focusing on access to technology, she shifted her focus to the purposeful use of technology for real interaction with content.”

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