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fkrobin2010

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #46 
Reframing is something I use frequently in my classroom.  With teaching early childhood, reframing is something you become a master at doing without even realizing it.  We use it often in teaching social skills.  Not all children know how to play or make friends.  Some think the way to make friends is to hit another.  Once I had a new student to join our class in the middle of the year.  This student was frequently hitting the others and getting into trouble.  I had to explain to him how to make friends and that it’s no okay to hit others.  I also explained to the others why this student was hitting them.  We modeled how to make friends and what it looked like.  We also modeled what the others could do to help the new student feel part of our classroom.  Initially this student was being characterized as a bully.  He soon learned how to make friends and the others learned how they can help new friends fit in. 
sabra_pittman14

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #47 
This past school year I was an inclusion/lifeskills aide. Through getting to know my individual students and their diverse needs I would try to position the content and lesson to what they liked and what interested them. For one particular student it was difficult for me, he was into farming, different farm equipment, and “trapping”. This student needed help reading/writing and it was hard for me to relate, not knowing about the different equipment he would want to talk/write about. I believe using the student’s likes/interests helps them have a better understanding of what is being taught. They are more likely to recall something from a lesson if they have something they can “tie” with an interest.
Bunnyhee71

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #48 
As an ESL pullout teacher, I am often pulling students out of interesting lessons that they don't want to miss in their regular classes. I try to make the group time interesting and fun enough that they won't hate coming with me. I create a safe and fun environment that they can't wait to go to. By the end of the year, their classmates will be begging to go with them to ESL. I din't realize it was positioning, but I guess it is in a way. Making the class something they don't mind leaving Fun Friday for is a great feeling. 
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