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msusong

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Review the “Teacher Checklist for Planning Differentiated, Responsive Instruction” on page 54 (chapter 3).
Choose one differentiation idea from this chapter to try in your classroom next year. Describe a specific way in which you plan to use it.


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Maggie Susong
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lorelai86

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Reply with quote  #2 
Review the “Teacher Checklist for Planning Differentiated, Responsive Instruction” on page 54 (chapter 3).
Choose one differentiation idea from this chapter to try in your classroom next year. Describe a specific way in which you plan to use it.
 


I plan to develop more anchor activities that are related to the unit.

One idea for an anchor activity was for building/practicing skills in math. The students would grab a worksheet, let's say on addition, and a deck of handmade cards numbered 1-9. The student would then create their own number sentence by drawing from the deck and put the number in place value order. So if the student mastered 2 digit addends, they could move on to 3-digit and so on. Students can access this after whole/small group instruction. Easy differentiation!

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Laura Niehues
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I work with our students in homeless situations and I do guidance in the elem classrooms so I am aware of individual student situations so I want to avoid deficit thinking so I don't make assumptions of a students ability based on their living situation. I also want to educate other staff on that as well so that each of us are are being responsive to individual needs. I want each student to know that effort is the big determiner in success. While I am teaching I am going to focus on previewing and preassesing to wake up prior learning in their brains.
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S. Braddock
mmlillie

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I definitely plan on using anchor activities this year.  I meant to do something like that last year (my first year teaching) but was very inconsistent with it.  It will be tremendously helpful to have kids engaged in something meaningful when they're done with classwork, without my having to come up with something on the spur of the moment...  

I'd like to incorporate some journal writing, and perhaps have them continually work on writing and revising stories even when we're not actually on a writing unit.  I'd also like to have some vocabulary activities and math game/facts work available for them to do.

 

smolina

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Review the “Teacher Checklist for Planning Differentiated, Responsive Instruction” on page 54 (chapter 3). 
Choose one differentiation idea from this chapter to try in your classroom next year. Describe a specific way in which you plan to use it.

One area that I would like to focus more on this coming year is using preassessments to determine what students already know and fill in any missing gaps they may have. I started doing something like this last year, but then I get crunched for time and I start making short cuts. So I am hoping to stick with it this coming year. 

I teach elementary, so I can do these preassessments during our morning work. It can be something I do orally by asking questions and having students respond with some type of hand signal (ex. thumbs up/thumbs down). I can then take notation on who knows what. I can also do some type of "exit ticket" at the end of each lesson, just to quickly determine which of my students comprehended the activity or lesson for the day. From their responses, I know what I need to target on and re-teach the next day before moving on. 

Selina
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As an inclusion teacher, my goal for this year will be to assist the teachers in all content areas with flexible grouping and not so much only with my special education students. But, to work with those who do not qualify for special education services and who are as much in need as any of my special ed students. I never have felt that my job was to "only" help those classified as special ed and feel that inclusion teachers can play a pivotal role in helping teachers with this kind of instructional reinforcement. I feel that this would free up the teacher to work with other groups so that we are catching all students within the short class time that we have them. 
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Sherry Ayres
jgoedken123

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Reply with quote  #7 
Review the “Teacher Checklist for Planning Differentiated, Responsive Instruction” on page 54 (chapter 3). 
Choose one differentiation idea from this chapter to try in your classroom next year. Describe a specific way in which you plan to use it.

"Students Take Pre-Assessment"
The math courses I teach are technology based.  A lot of times I skip over the pre-assessments and just take them directly to the instruction.  This year, I will try to integrate the pre-assessments and allow the techhnology to be more individually based.

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Jennifer Goedken
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I know how it feels to sit through a class or a training and feel completely lost and incompetent. Is this a feeling I want for my students? Not at all. Chapter three begins with a very inspiring quote: "My brain is getting smarter and smarter each day." This is my daily goal - to make ALL students feel this way through differentiated classroom instruction. I will be adding "anchor activities" to my repertoire for the upcoming school year. These activities will be fun, engaging, and enriching to their understanding and knowledge of what we are studying in the classroom. The gradual release method is used throughout the district and doing anchor activities will allow me to work with small groups. In middle school I think this would be an awesome way to hold students accountable while promoting a growth mindset.
tamram

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My favorite suggestion for differentiation in Ricci’s book so far is providing students with “anchor” activities, defined as on-going tasks that students can work on after their daily work is complete. The tasks are to be linked to the topics covered and are to be completed individually. The topics are linked to the lesson but there is latitude in how tightly.

I love the idea of anchor activities for the following reasons:

1). It would give the students who finish the lesson a chance for a challenge not provided in the lesson. I can imagine an early algebra student finishing before 8th grade math students and could apply some algebra knowledge to polling for the election.

2). The idea, from the book, of having a folder with anchor activity is practical because a student would choose and perhaps feel more committed to the activity and feel some ownership.

3). Lastly, it is possible to put activities in the folder that may not correspond directly to the day’s lesson. This could be useful when a student claiming disinterest in math knows an interesting activity awaits that doesn’t have MATH written on it.

 


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Tamra M.
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Newt82

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I really like using preassessments a few minutes before I start a new topic to activate background knowledge. I’ve done this before either on my own when I substituted in a class or a teacher left instructions for me to do it in her lesson plans.

When I’ve done it before, I’ve asked students quick questions see what they might already know. They’ve always responded orally and not everyone has participated. Next year I will tweak it, by having students do thumbs up or down or write on white boards (they love the white boards!). Also they can voice any questions they might have about the new topic or subject. Exit cards are also a great idea! Last year a fifth grade teacher had me hand out cards with the instructions for the students to write three things they learned and one question they had about what they just learned.

hberdis

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I need to take the time to identify students who already understand the material and have the basic skills required for my vocational training.  Although they are required to demonstrate knowledge of all content, there are many areas where I could allow them to skip through the learning and repetitive assignments. And it might encourage some of the slackers to step up to the plate and show off their abilities so that I will let them skip as well.

mafield

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Reply with quote  #12 
Preassessment!  Informal at the very least to spend time teaching what the student needs most.
ViCindy

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Review the “Teacher Checklist for Planning Differentiated, Responsive Instruction” on page 54 (chapter 3).
Choose one differentiation idea from this chapter to try in your classroom next year. Describe a specific way in which you plan to use it.

Using the Students take preassessment - analyze preassessments: determine areas already mastered, any gaps that may exist, and areas of need for each student.

By preassessing through an exit ticket question I will spend less time on materials the students already know and more time with the greater details of what lead up or caused an event in American History or U.S. Government.
Amancillas

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Reply with quote  #14 
So many great ideas in this chapter that I could see using at the middle school level or if my college class was structured differently.  Since I teach college, I think the best one for me to implement this year is formative assessment.  I plan to flip my classroom, so students will be doing a short activity (this will be my formative assessment) before starting on homework.  I've done this before with great success but the last few semesters have given into my students wanting a more traditional method of teaching.  I'm standing my ground this year because what I've learned is that when students are doing homework on a computer, they can easily look like they understand and are breezing through the problems.  When I've had activities to do before the homework portion, I'm able to see what they know (preassessment?), who is struggling and with what concepts, and if a majority are struggling on a certain concept, I am able to address that with the whole class.  It also allows me the opportunity to help students more individually or in small groups prior to them starting their homework. 

Stephanie

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Reply with quote  #15 
eview the “Teacher Checklist for Planning Differentiated, Responsive Instruction” on page 54 (chapter 3). 
Choose one differentiation idea from this chapter to try in your classroom next year. Describe a specific way in which you plan to use it

One way I would like to use the checklist is for preassessment is for math.  I would like to start to use differentiated grouping to make it more student centered.  I do the math plans for my grade level and that would be the easiest for me to incorporate into the lesson plans.  We seem to group easily for reading, now I would like to start the same thing for math.  We have a cirrculum that has a lot of material and we need to start using it.  Last year I sorta used anchor charts.  This year I want to use them more for the units we are studying and then have them available for the students to use through out the year, especially in reading.

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SKDroddy
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