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Amancillas

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Posts: 37
Reply with quote  #61 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8thgradeteacher
I just completed my 4th year of teaching and every year, I learn how to do and not to do things.  Reflecting on this past year, my students expected (and received) from me an agenda of each day's activities.  I posted it on my white board and trained my students to check the board every day for their assignments.  This absolutely makes the class run smoothly because students know where to look to find out what we are doing in class that day.

At the beginning of each semester (I teach a 1-semester class twice a year), I went over classroom rules, information about me, what my expectations were for each student and what they could expect from me.  We talked about procedures for entering/exiting the classroom, turning in assignments, and where to look for work they missed when they were absent.  I realize now that what I didn't do is teach the procedures, model them, and have students role-play them.  Instead, I showed a PowerPoint a few days and then went on to other items.  

This fall, I plan to show a video of what a busy class looks like (I made a cell phone video of my best class this past year because they were all on task and behaving beautifully!). I also plan to make a funny video showing some teachers coming into my classroom the correct way (and the incorrect way).
I plan to spend more time on teaching and reinforcing our class procedures.




I love your idea of showing a video of a busy class and more so that it's one of your actual previous classes. Also a funny video of teachers modeling correct and incorrect procedures sounds great. It will grab the students attention and they will remember the expectations better than reading them off a PowerPoint. Great ideas!!
CharlotteL

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Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #62 
I read Ms. Ritter's post, theteach, and I can empathize with her as I moved grades last year as well.  I moved from Pre-K & Kindergarten to Second grade, and found that I should have had higher expectations for their abilities as more independent than the younger grades. I think that is great she is already working on her slide show for procedures, the daily reminders for the desk, and reviewing her procedures!  It motivates me to also prepare this summer, when you have more time! I believe Ms. Ritter will have a great year with all this in place, as well as, having assigned seats!
BurntOrangeStrong

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #63 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJML220
Since I've been teaching over 20 years now, I have been using lots of procedures for different situations already.  It's nice to know that this book is able to answer questions I've been trying to figure out myself just to gain more organization to my classroom.  My students expect a fun, but professionally run classroom.  Most students say that they like the fact that my classroom is fairly predictable.  The goals listed on page 18 are goals I definitely would like in my classes.

While I have had organization and procedures, next year I will use the first day to cover and model all procedures.  This book has given me the confidence and affirmation that what I have been doing in my classroom is the right way.  I just need to be much more diligent about introducing these on the first day or days and to also have the procedures and rules displayed in the classroom. 

This gives me something positive to work on throughout my summer so that I am well prepared on the first day!


Melissa,

I love the fact that you've been teaching for 20 years and still you are working to grow as an educator.  I believe that the minute we stop growing we become complacent and obsolete.  Kudos to you for continuing to hone your craft... the students are the ones who will benefit the most from your continual evolution.  

In a professional learning community teachers are constantly being challenged and asked to grow together in developing new knowledge about education.  The process of continual growth is tantamount to the culture of the school.  Teachers become learners right along with their students.  Schools that are intent on providing the best possible education to their students must embrace the idea of continual growth with open arms.  It must be a dogma that all learners in the building hold as a core value.
falcon20

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #64 
Before my 3rd year of teaching the school district I was a part of at that time had an inservice and had us to go through Harry Wong's book "The First Days of School".  I have utilized many of the things in that book.  It has been 17 years since I have read it.  This has reminded me of many suggestions I had read and also given me a few that either I skipped over or did not pay attention to 17 yrs ago.  I have used the assigned seating since reading through the first book as well as using the expectations on the board each day.  PLan to make my classroom even better this fall.
OnaBethDay

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Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #65 
Question 1-clarification
Thinking back to last year -I want my students to know what I expect of them and what they should expect from me. My expectations: Be prepared, Be prompt, Be Productive-explain what does this really mean and what's does this look like. I will set positive Expectations for all students. I will take the time to show what quality work looks like, what I expect from the class as a whole and what we should expect from each other. I will assure them that I will: Give quality instruction, provide extra help, create a positive learning environment, give credit for practice. Give fair grades, show respect. I want to give my students a chance to learn each other's names and spend some time getting to know each other and trust each other. I am going to work on being more organized and leave a sub binder with my procedures listed.

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Ona Beth Day 
whb2014

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #66 

Thinking back on the school year we’ve just ended my students could expect for me to hold them accountable for being engaged in the skills being taught and to become independent thinkers.  They could also expect for me to listen to what they had to say and provide care and nurture as it pertained to their individual needs.

The expectations from the teacher as listed on page 18 were exactly what I wanted to exhibit to my students from Day 1.  I think the piece that I was missing and would change is consistency and repetition.  I believe I had the correct ingredients, but I failed in being consistent with modeling the behaviors so that my students could adopt the expected behaviors.  My students were kindergarten students and it’s important that the expectations be modeled repeatedly and rehearsed daily for them to internalize and adopt the desire behaviors.

As I prepare for the upcoming school year I am making plans to be more deliberate in what I expect from my students.  I plan to include the repetition they need and consistency in carrying out the process.  I know that at the beginning it may be a lot more work, but it will definitely payoff in the end.
whb2014

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #67 
Quote:
Originally Posted by falcon20
Before my 3rd year of teaching the school district I was a part of at that time had an inservice and had us to go through Harry Wong's book "The First Days of School".  I have utilized many of the things in that book.  It has been 17 years since I have read it.  This has reminded me of many suggestions I had read and also given me a few that either I skipped over or did not pay attention to 17 yrs ago.  I have used the assigned seating since reading through the first book as well as using the expectations on the board each day.  PLan to make my classroom even better this fall.



falcon20,

I totally understand how you can get out of practice with doing something that once was very useful to your classroom structure.  I think at this point it is very important that you give yourself credit for recognizing the need for change and that you are taking the steps to implement the changes.  

I have my expectations posted in serveral areas in the classroom so that the students can use them to remind themselves of the expectations whenever necessary.  It is very important that students are taught to take responsibility for their own actions. 
 
tarheels6922303

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #68 
My students could expect fairness & consistency.  I wish they would take me seriously, though.  As I heard from someone just recently, "you've taught them to disrespect you."  I need to change that.  That is one of the problems with special ed.  I have them 3-4 years, way too long for all of us!  I've read all the books & attended workshops. Help!!!
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Sue Sutphin
tarheels6922303

Registered:
Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #69 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BurntOrangeStrong
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJML220
Since I've been teaching over 20 years now, I have been using lots of procedures for different situations already.  It's nice to know that this book is able to answer questions I've been trying to figure out myself just to gain more organization to my classroom.  My students expect a fun, but professionally run classroom.  Most students say that they like the fact that my classroom is fairly predictable.  The goals listed on page 18 are goals I definitely would like in my classes.

While I have had organization and procedures, next year I will use the first day to cover and model all procedures.  This book has given me the confidence and affirmation that what I have been doing in my classroom is the right way.  I just need to be much more diligent about introducing these on the first day or days and to also have the procedures and rules displayed in the classroom. 

This gives me something positive to work on throughout my summer so that I am well prepared on the first day!


Melissa,

I love the fact that you've been teaching for 20 years and still you are working to grow as an educator.  I believe that the minute we stop growing we become complacent and obsolete.  Kudos to you for continuing to hone your craft... the students are the ones who will benefit the most from your continual evolution.  

In a professional learning community teachers are constantly being challenged and asked to grow together in developing new knowledge about education.  The process of continual growth is tantamount to the culture of the school.  Teachers become learners right along with their students.  Schools that are intent on providing the best possible education to their students must embrace the idea of continual growth with open arms.  It must be a dogma that all learners in the building hold as a core value.

__________________
Sue Sutphin
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